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Remember the best quotes from the last 19 years of history of the World Jiu-Jitsu championship

selo_hayabusaIt’s not just submissions, takedowns; guard passes and sweeps that make up the history of the Jiu-Jitsu Worlds. The mat wizards who inhabit the pantheon of stars of the last 19 installments of the greatest gentle art competition show they are black belts also when they open their mouths to speak.

Ever since the first edition in 1996, our stars have filled the web pages of GRACIEMAG.com with timeless utterances. Words of disgust, bursts of joy, good cheer, relief and humility spill from their lips.

GRACIEMAG.com dove into the past 19 years of the Worlds to rescue the best phrases uttered by the dynamos of the mats. And, of course, if you remember something once said that didn’t make it on here, don’t hesitate to post in the comments section.

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A lot of folks called me crazy for creating the Jiu-Jitsu World Championship, in 1996. They’d say the sport was still just crawling and need to grow a lot before there could be such a competition, but I knew the Worlds was going to lead Jiu-Jitsu to growth – Carlos Gracie Jr, CBJJ / IBJJF president. Photo by Luca Atalla
A lot of folks called me crazy for creating the Jiu-Jitsu World Championship, in 1996. They’d say the sport was still just crawling and need to grow a lot before there could be such a competition, but I knew the Worlds was going to lead Jiu-Jitsu to growth – Carlos Gracie Jr, CBJJ / IBJJF president. Photo by Luca Atalla

Finally! – Vitor “Shaolin” Ribeiro, in 2000, upon beating Leo Vieira after three losses in three matches

I’m wearing my underwear and it’s not my fault he’s not wearing his – Daniel Simões, in 2000, commenting on his controversial loss to Saulo Ribeiro in the super heavyweight division.

I got to beat on my chest. I’m the only five-time world champion. At least until next year – Robson Moura, in 2000, upon winning his fifth gold medal in five world championships.

I’m stoked! Tonight there’s going to be a party in the favela! – Fernando Tererê, in 2000, after winning the middleweight division with his victory over Nino Schembri.

To keep them from saying I’m running away, I decided to go out on a limb, but I fought with a twisted ankle – Márcio Pé de Pano, in 2001, after dropping out of the absolute in the semifinal.

I’m a heck of a salesman! – Vitor Shaolin, in 2001, after winning his second world title and selling his gi to a Japanese spectator for 200 dollars.

There’s still one more coming! – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2001, after losing the medium heavyweight final to Margarida, warning that the two would meet again in the open weight final (a match he would also lose to Margarida).

I scored my two points and hung on, which doesn’t go over too well in a final – Fredson Paixão, in 2001, confessing that he stalled in the featherweight final.

I watched his matches so many times that the tape broke – Fredson Paixão, in 2002, with reverence for Ricardo De La Riva, who he beat in the featherweight final.

Jacaré squashes his opponents, submits them and walks off wearing the same expression he bore when he went in, without even sweat on his face. Look at that – Ryan Gracie, in 2002, impressed by then-brown belt Ronaldo Souza.

He carries a lot of weight and big old legs! – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2002, explaining what Pé de Pano’s weapons were, after the absolute final.

I was 30% in shape, but that’s enough for today’s Jiu-Jitsu – Márcio Pé de Pano, in 2003, after winning his second absolute title in a row. Photo by Gustavo Aragão
I was 30% in shape, but that’s enough for today’s Jiu-Jitsu – Márcio Pé de Pano, in 2003, after winning his second absolute title in a row. Photo by Gustavo Aragão

Look at that, now he’s in the mix, too! – Márcio Pé de Pano, in 2003, after seeing Jacaré get his black belt, on the podium.

I still want Pé de Pano. He’s the best and I want to be the best by beating him – Fabrício Werdum, in 2003, after winning the ultraheavyweight division.

I hit a big old plate of rice, beans and chicken at Tererê’s house. It was so good and was stuffed when I fought – Ronaldo Jacaré, in 2003, explaining why he started off slow in his showing at brown belt.

At least I lost to the champ. Or do you think someone’s going to beat that monster? – Roberto Traven, in 2003, predicting Jefferson Moura’s opponents in the heavyweight division wouldn’t stand a chance.

The poor are used to sleeping under a fan. I got hit with a nasty air conditioner on the bus from São Paulo to Rio and caught an awful cold – Fernando Tererê, in 2003, on the rough ride he had before winning his second middleweight title.

Once it was over, I felt like crying and hugging everyone in the stands, I was so happy – Felipe Costa, in 2003, after winning the roosterweight title.

I never had a knack for it, but I train a lot – Felipe Costa, em 2003.

The score stands at 1 to 1, but I took an arm in advantage – Roger Gracie, in 2004, after losing to Jacaré in the most controversial absolute final of Worlds history.

I’m not stopping! I’m not stopping! – Jacaré, in 2004, after escaping Roger’s armbar. Photo by Gustavo Aragão
I’m not stopping! I’m not stopping! – Jacaré, in 2004, after escaping Roger’s armbar. Photo by Gustavo Aragão

I regret nothing! – Ronaldo Jacaré, in 2004, on not having tapped to Roger’s armbar.

He didn’t give me any room, all I could move were my eyes! – Fernando Tererê, in 2004, on his loss to Roger in the absolute.

He has no arms or neck; makes it hard to attack him – Marcelo Uirapuru, in 2004, in praise of Marcelinho after losing in the absolute.

I wanted to show how the ant can beat the cockroach – Fernando Tererê, in 2004, after entering the ultraheavyweight division weighing just 80 kg.

Just because I’ve fought in all the Worlds’ folks call me old. But I’m 30 – Cássio Werneck, in 2004.

If they don’t watch out, I’ll submit a lot of purple belt men. I’m strong as hell – Mirella Cortes, in 2004.

I didn’t get on the stand because I didn’t lose. To pick up the silver medal would be to recognize defeat – Roger Gracie, in 2005, after more controversy with Jacaré.

If I’d lost, no one on my team would have questioned the result – Jacaré, in 2005, complaining about Roger’s team whining.

Jacaré only fired off one shot, but it was a bull’s eye! – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2005, on Jacaré’s strategy against Roger.

I wanted to submit Roger and he wanted to submit me. That’s why the match was so good – Xande Ribeiro, in 2006, on the absolute final.

I don’t even know what I did. I just used my grandfather’s and father’s Jiu-Jitsu, which I’ve been practicing since I was a kid – Kron Gracie, in 2006, at 18 years of age, already drawing attention as a purple belt.

You see my fight? I got taken on a carousel ride! – Marcinho Feitosa, in 2006, cheerful even after losing to Cobrinha. Photo by Pedro Stabile
You see my fight? I got taken on a carousel ride! – Marcinho Feitosa, in 2006, cheerful even after losing to Cobrinha. Photo by Pedro Stabile

It was worthy of Rocky Balboa. He got beat up the whole time, and then in the end: pow! – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2006, commenting on Xande’s strategy in the absolute final.

Seems like there’s a car on top of you – Robert Drysdale, in 2006, regarding the pressure of Roger Gracie

That’s seven! – Robson Moura, in 2007, on winning his seventh title.

Get your hands off me! – Luiz Theodoro “Big Mac”, in 2007, still disgusted with the close decision favoring Rafael Lovato Jr in the ultraheavyweight division.

Triangle defense and standing! – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2007, teaching how he avoided tapping out to Rômulo Barral in the medium heavyweight division.

This medal takes four years of weight off my back – Roger Gracie, in 2007, relieved for winning the absolute gold medal.

I’m going to stop being the nice guy! – Xande Ribeiro, in 2008, complaining about a controversial move by Gabriel Vella, who denied tapping to an armbar.

You need a ladder to fight him – André Galvão, in 2008, after facing Roger in the absolute.

Pull guard, Roger! – Renzo Gracie, in 2008, foreseeing that playing the standup game would not end well for his nephew in the absolute against Xande.

This win goes to respect in Jiu-Jitsu. The Gracie Barra crowd offended me! – Xande Ribeiro, in 2008, shortly after becoming two-time absolute champion.

There isn’t a name for that takedown yet, so we’ll call it xandeguruma! – Xande Ribeiro, in 2008, dubbing the takedown that yielded him the two-time absolute title.

Japanese fighters are always tough. They don’t tap! – Samuel Braga, light featherweight champion, in 2008.

I came here to be champion! – Mário Reis, in 2008, complaining of the refereeing.

I tapped! – Kron Gracie, in 2008, still in disbelief over the outcome of his black belt debut against Sérgio Moraes.

By training a lot, I’m getting to Tererê’s level, but he was a natural – André Galvão in 2008, in tribute to his eternal master after winning the medium heavyweight division.

I moved up in weight to escape Roger and when I look at the bracket, who do I see? Roger – Eduardo Telles, in 2008, laughing as he saw the pairings in the ultra heavyweight division.

I never imagined he was that much better than the rest – Guy Richie, in 2009, on his teacher Roger Gracie.

That’s the so-called invisible Jiu-Jitsu – Saulo Ribeiro, in 2009, referring to Roger’s performance.

Oooh, there goes the blanket! – Gracie Barra cheering section, in 2009, during Roger Gracie’s matches. Photo by Ivan Trindade
Oooh, there goes the blanket! – Gracie Barra cheering section, in 2009, during Roger Gracie’s matches. Photo by Ivan Trindade

It even spoils the fun when I don’t get taken down – Roger Gracie, in 2009, joking about his “weak point”.

Next year I’ll be back for us to put on that show again – Xande Ribeiro, in 2009, saluting Roger for his second absolute title.

I felt like crying from training so much – Bruno Malfacine, in 2009, on his prep work at Alliance

We’re bothering some people! – Guilherme Mendes, in 2009, to the Alliance cheering section.

The snake had two heads! – Rubens Charles Cobrinha, in 2009, responding to provocations from the Mendes brothers in Abu Dhabi one month earlier.

I only beat Kyra because I’m big – Lana Stefanac, in 2009, after being crowned champion of the absolute black belt division.

“We both pulled guard, and I landed with the hold on his foot already in place. Bad luck for him and good luck for me,” – Rodrigo Cavaca, in 2010, explaining his victory over Roberto Cyborg in the open class.

“Look, there’s no such thing as the master division to me. I’m going to compete as an adult until I realize I can no longer handle the new kids’ pace. Right now–at 28 years of age, Ican’t see myself stopping until I’m 34, 35 years old.” – Roger Gracie, in 2010, making a promise life didn’t allow him to fulfill.

“Ever since ADCC 2003 people come up to me and say, ‘Did you see your bracket? It’s the toughest one there is!’ And I always reply with ‘I didn’t even look.’ It’s always the tough- est bracket, but thank God I al- ways win it,” – Marcelo Garcia, in 2010, explaining his attitude towards his opponents.

“I was the underdog, but everyone has two arms and two legs and can thus be beat. If now I’m a favorite, I’m going to train even more for it!” – Bernardo Faria, in 2010, about his win over Xande Ribeiro.

“Shoot, this is the happiest day of my life!” – Gabi Garcia, in 2010, after two golds and a poium-tied black belt.

“We’re always gunning for who’s on top, and today the one on top is Rodolfo. He came on way strong.” – Sergio Moraes, in 2011, recognizing the superior performance of the open class champion.

“Shut up!” – Rodolfo Vieira, in 2011, telling his crowd to stop celebrating his win before the fight was over.

“I’m not invincible; far from it. But I train to be the best!” – Gabi Garcia, in 2011.

“This is my life! We put in 100% and want 200%.” – Sergio Moraes, in 2011. Photo by Ivan Trindade
“This is my life! We put in 100% and want 200%.” – Sergio Moraes, in 2011. Photo by Ivan Trindade

“He believes in me more than I do myself.” – Marcus Buchecha, in 2012, on the importance of his coach Rodrigo Cavaca.

“I was sort of ron- aldo Jacaré in there! My arm popped all the way through, but they were only going to beat me if they choked my lights out or ripped off an arm or a leg!” – Marcus Buchecha, in 2012, on the armbar Rodolfo Vieira had in place at the very end of their quarterfinal match.

“They’re going to pay more attention to me and my matches now.” – Otavio Sousa, in 2012, after his first gold medal as a black belt.

“For what I’ve trained, in all modesty, I was expecting this result” – Leo Nogueira, in 2012, after gold in the super-heavy and silver in the absolute.

“Nowadays, he’s the only one who is able to annul my game completely.” – Rodolfo Vieira, in 2013, after the 0-9 defeat to Buchecha in the open class final. Photo By Ivan Trindade
“Nowadays, he’s the only one who is able to annul my game completely.” – Rodolfo Vieira, in 2013, after the 0-9 defeat to Buchecha in the open class final. Photo By Ivan Trindade

“I submitted nobody, I have to improve,” – Leandro Lo, in 2013, analysing his own performance after his second world title.

“The category had the two- time champion Mário Reis, three-time champion Rafael Mendes and four-time champion Cobrinha. Only I had no title.”- Augusto Tanquinho, in 2013, joking about his motivation to win gold at featherweight.

“I think I lost the first ten championships I played. I’d always come back with bigger motivation to train more.”- Felipe Preguiça, in 2014, after winning his first world title as a black belt.

“Cavaca used to say there’s the talented one, the hard-working one and there’s me, the talented hard-working guy!” – Marcus Buchecha, after wining his third open class title in 2014.

“Buchecha is stalling!”- Atos Jiu-Jitsu coach during the open class semifinal between Buchecha and Keenan Cornelius, in 2014.

“I’m a staller?! Are you sure of that?!!!”- Marcus Buchecha to the same guy after passing Keenan’s guard in the last minute of the fight.

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